Artigos: Post-Academic Manifesto e Against Design


#1

Texto de Jason Rohrer:

http://hcsoftware.sourceforge.net/jason-rohrer/writing/nonfiction/postAcademia/

[b]Post-Academic Manifesto[/b]

1 Scope
The publication of this document marks the start of a new movement, a movement hereafter referred to as the post-academic movement. This movement aims to shape a new institution, or perhaps simply a new paradigm, hereafter referred to as post-academia.

2 Motivation
The post-academic movement is motivated by the current state of academia, which is one of intellectual decay and derailment, largely due to overcrowding and blind self-perpetuation. ``Academia’’ itself is a rather new entity, debatably not more that one-hundred years old. The current state of academia can be traced back perhaps fifty years, though as an outcome it might be seen as an inevitable. The state is marked by the following characteristics:

publication as the central motivator
research as an afterthought to publication
an exhaustion of fundamentally worthwhile research areas
overpopulation
an excessive use of mathematics
attempts to make rather trivial ideas appear more complex
extraordinarily long papers that are filled with a rehash of past work
``forced'' references
extraordinarily long reference lists
heavy use of jargon words that add no more meaning than the corresponding common words would
purposeful alienation of the layperson
a flood of low-quality publications
publication of ideas and work that do not demand publication
an acceptance (and encouragement) of the current state of academia

3 Proposal
This manifesto proposes 9 corrections to the current state of academia. These corrections can be implemented on a per-individual basis. The benefit to the correcting individual dramatically increases if others are also implementing the corrections. However, a single individual, acting alone, can reap enormous self-benefit, even if he or she is the only one implementing the corrections.

The proposed corrections can be seen as reactionary: in essence, they call for a return to the state academia was in before academia as we know it existed.

The corrections are listed below. Greater detail about each correction is given in what follows.

a thirst for knowledge as the central motivator
publication as an afterthought to research
avoiding the use of mathematics where it is unnecessary
presenting ideas in the simplest terms possible
writing short papers that are to the point
including references only where they are completely natural and necessary
substituting commonly used equivalent words in the place of jargon
only publishing work that truly demands publication
refusing to accept the work of others who do not implement the corrections listed in this manifesto

a thirst for knowledge as the central motivator
Research should be motivated by the thirst for knowledge. The money resulting from said knowledge (as from the sale of an invention) is not forbidden as a motivator for this thirst.

publication as an afterthought to research
The idea of publication should occur after the corresponding research is complete and should be accompanied by a variation on the following thought: ``You know, other people might truly benefit from learning about these results.’’

avoiding the use of mathematics where it is unnecessary
Though mathematics can be a very precise language, it can also obscure simple relationships under a veil of symbols. The English language (as an example of a non-mathematical language) can be very precise when used properly.

presenting ideas in the simplest terms possible
Simple underlying ideas should be presented with simple explanations. Simple ideas should never be ``fluffed up’’ with overly complicated wording and explanations.

writing short papers that are to the point
Papers should be as brief as possible while still including all necessary information. The focus of a paper should be on presenting the new idea and its associated proofs and experiments. Each paper should focus on the presentation of a single new idea: a collection of mediocre ideas is no substitute for one excellent idea. The addition of several mediocre ideas around one central, excellent idea does not improve the quality of a paper.

including references only where they are completely natural and necessary
References should be used sparingly and never ``forced’’ just for the sake of including references.

substituting commonly used equivalent words in the place of jargon
Researchers should never hide behind jargon or use jargon to make simple ideas sound more complex. As an example, all occurrences of the word stochastic'' should be replaced by the wordrandom’’. Any jargon that is necessary for the sake of conciseness should be suitably worded and fully explained before being used. Coining new terms to replace existing, unclear terms may be necessary.

only publishing work that truly demands publication
Not all work is worth publishing. Will people likely read the proposed publication in two years? If not, then the material is not worth publishing. Just because work is not worth publishing does not mean it is not worth doing. The history of research is filled with work that was great yet unpublishable.

refusing to accept the work of others who do not implement the corrections listed in this manifesto
In doing so, you will help to reduce overpopulation and the flood of low-quality publications.


#2

Poxa, isso é de 2002 o.O

Pensei que a mania de publicar papers loucamenete era algo que começou no final da década passada.


#3

Também me impressiona o quanto o documento permanece atual. xD


#4

Texto por Frank Lantz:

http://gamedesignadvance.com/?p=2930

[b]Against Design[/b]

I’m a game designer. And I teach game design. So I have a lot invested in the idea that game design is a discipline, maybe a young discipline, one that is still defining itself, but nonetheless a legitimate, professional design discipline with established principles and techniques and hard-won knowledge to be cherished and preserved. And I believe that idea. I do believe game design is something you can study and learn and work to master.

But lately I find myself questioning design as a way of understanding where games come from and what makes them work. There are so many great games in the world that don’t reflect good design principles, or that don’t seem designed at all.

Look at Shadow of the Colossus for example. What do we, as game designers, know about videogames? Well, we know a few things, we know boss battles suck. We know jumping puzzles suck. We know you get great games by focusing on meaningful interaction and you don’t get great games from aping cinema and focusing on graphics.

So, how about a videogame that is nothing but boss battles, and each boss battle is a jumping puzzle, and the whole thing is set in a giant empty world with nothing to interact with, and a lot of the main motivation of the game was an attempt to achieve some film-inspired visual effects? Does that sound like a good recipe for creating one of the greatest videogames of all time?

Or take League of Legends. This game breaks so many rules of “good design”. It is a clone. It is over-complicated to the point of utter indecipherability. It is fussy, baroque, full of arbitrary, non-intuitive details (Last hitting? Inhibitors??). It makes no attempt to teach the player or draw them into its labyrinthian systems. If you didn’t grow up playing it you might as well not bother trying to learn. And it’s the most popular videogame in the world, and maybe the most important and the most beautiful.

Look at the AWP, the signature 1-hit-kill weapon in Counter-Strike. It’s completely unbalanced. Any sensible game designer would have rejected it. Luckily for us, Counter-Strike wasn’t made by sensible designers, it was made by unreasonable people who kept this unbalanced ingredient and evolved the rest of the game around it.

Or look at Counter-Strike surfing, one of the weirdest, most beautiful and interesting game genres of the past 10 years, which was created by players and map-makers without the help of any official game designers at all, thank you very much.

I admire good design. I respect good design. But I have to admit that many of the games I have truly loved do not seem to be the result of good design, they seem like beautiful accidents, hot messes, mistakes that worked, acts of God, or lucky, miraculous mutations.

Design implies a kind of rationality, an ability to identify clearly-defined problems and apply known techniques to solve them. But I think we overestimate the utility of our definitions and the power of our techniques. Like economists who overestimate the predictive power of their mathematical models we are overconfident about our ability to predict and explain the qualities that make great games.

I have even grown skeptical of the iconic image of the designer – smart, confident, sophisticated, stylish, informed. This image has come to represent a romantic illusion about the scope of our ability to define and solve problems.

But songs are not designed, paintings are not designed, poems are not designed.

The alternative is terrifying. That we don’t know, that we will never know, that the problems we are trying to solve are not only unsolvable but undefinable, inexpressible, beyond comprehension. That we are negotiating with trees and shouting at volcanoes. But I have come to believe that this alternative is the truth. Or, more precisely, that the truth resides somewhere in between – close enough to seduce us with faint glimpses of its profile, far enough to forever elude the grasp of our design patterns, our textbooks, our lesson plans and our clever blog posts.

I recognize the value of building an established discipline, and of crafting a shared set of principles that define game design as a profession. But, I also think that in our efforts to define and legitimize our practice as a professional discipline we sometimes forget the history we inherit, the legacy of games made by communities of players, games made by amateurs, by dilettantes, by mathematicians, mothers, scientists, gym teachers, shepherds, inventors, philosophers, eccentrics and cranks.

And in honor of this tradition I would like to suggest other verbs for us to describe where games come from, alternatives to the overconfident precision of the word “design”. Words like invent, discover, compose, write, find, grow, perform, build, support, identify, copy, re-assemble, excavate and preserve.

At the NYU Game Center we struggle with this issue daily. Our approach is to define game design broadly, as the act of making games in a way that is driven by vision, in pursuit of a creative goal, mindful of how what you make will intersect with the people who play it, of how it will intersect with the world. We teach critical literacy and the fundamental principles of solid design, but within a context that leaves space for the unknown. Game design, from this perspective, is not so much the application of rules and guidelines as it is an unruly collision of divine inspiration, hard work, and good taste.

And for my part I will continue to design games, because that’s all I know how to do. But I will attempt to do so with a renewed sense of humility before the inexplicable greatness of games that have managed to spin the silver thread of love from the wool of the world in ways that I cannot hope to understand. Clutching my rulers and my pencils to my chest, in the night, in the middle of the storm, begging for lightning.


#5

Eu consigo muito fácil imaginar o Rica recitando esse texto em frente a uma plateia.


#6

Esse texto de design… eu sinto que esse cara se apoiava muito na parte científica da coisa… e agora está frustrado com o que está fora da fronteira científica e resolveu partir pro acaso se não o exotérico.

Ou que provavelmente esse cara não entende de visão sistemica e visão relativa.

[set indignation = 0]

Eu nunca afirmaria as coisas que ele comentou qualitativamente sobre os game elements e mais ainda sobre música, pinturas e poemas. Se o que ele falou representa a escola atual de game-design, ela está muito ruim, ou eu não entendo nada de design.

Na construção de arte ou qualquer produto, existe a produção de conhecimento, mesmo que seja no nível intrapessoal, a partir da experiência de criação. E considerando que as pessoas usam o conhecimento acumulado naturalmente, surge um design acumulado ao longo do tempo. Isso é muito evidente na evolução de um dado autor, ou na históŕia da música clássica.

O problema é achar que uma vez que X funcionou, então X sempre funcionará. Fazer isso é se limitar e condenar-se a uma morte a longo prazo, melhor traduzido como a sucessão natural das escolas de literatura.

É bom ver ele admitir que não há design absoluto, mas com certeza o trabalho dos que saem do “mainstream” não é obra do acaso e reacaem somente sobre bom gosto e inspiração aleatórios… eles tem fonte, e dá para trabalha-los.

Mas explicar isso não dá no tempo que tenho pra esse post. XD Talvez deem um assunto pra discussão/palestra.

P.S.: O primeiro texto é muito top!


#7

Ele não disse que vai jogar no lixo tudo que ele aprendeu sobre design. Ele só disse que vai tentar ter a mente mais aberta. Inclusive, parece que tem um cara que comentou no blog dele que fez a mesma interpretação que você. Sempre achei curioso isso: o que será que faz leitores assumirem significados tão extremos com tanta facilidade?

Você se refere a esse trecho?

But songs are not designed, paintings are not designed, poems are not designed.

Se sim, do que eu entendo de design, isso faz certo sentido. Se lembrarmos que “design” se traduz como “projeto”, e “projetar” envolve um “método”, então é razoável dizer isso se ele estiver se referindo à intenção artística dos autores. Isso é, o ato físico de pintar em si pode envolver um “método” (por exemplo), mas a escolha do que pintar e do porquê não parece envolver.

Ele não contradiz isso. Apenas observa que o “design acumulado” academicamente sistematizado é insuficiente. O que talvez seja um crítica melhor é ele aparentemente assumir que não seja possível sistematizar tudo.

Algo assim seria mais uma ciência. E a ciência é legal justamente porque ela nos dá esse tipo de garantia. Acho perfeitamente compreensível que ele goste desse tipo de conforto intelectual. E ele mesmo disse que tem medo da falta de sistematização. Se ele mesmo tem noção disso, não vejo porque cutucar ainda mais a ferida - eu me sentiria puramente sádico.

Na verdade, ele disse:

Game design, from this perspective, is not so much the application of rules and guidelines as it is an unruly collision of divine inspiration, hard work, and good taste.

Assim como em muitas outras partes do texto, ele está sendo altamente conotativo. Eu leio “an unruly collision of divine inspiration, hard work, and good taste” como “uma sinergia de experiência pessoal e profissional não-documentada, esforço e bom senso”. Novamente, acho bom sempre evitarmos interpretar tudo ao extremo. Ele até colocou explicitamente “hard work” e você simplesmente ignorou XD.

Acredito que a principal ideia que o texto quis passar (principalmente seguindo o contexto original dessa thread que o Chico fez) é que não devemos colocar a Academia em um pedestal. Não é porque algo não está em um artigo que a ideia não será boa. Nesse sentido, minha única crítica ao texto seria: “Thanks, captain obvious”.


#8

Bem, admito que eu pessoalmente fiquei irritado com o texto. Eu sabia que deveria revisar mais de uma vez antes de partir, e por isso mesmo que ele saiu uma porcaria. Então deixe-me explicar melhor:

[quote=“Kazuo, post:7, topic:372”][quote author=Adamastor link=topic=1749.msg3225#msg3225 date=1430325016]
Esse texto de design… eu sinto que esse cara se apoiava muito na parte científica da coisa… e agora está frustrado com o que está fora da fronteira científica e resolveu partir pro acaso se não o exotérico.
[/quote]

Ele não disse que vai jogar no lixo tudo que ele aprendeu sobre design. Ele só disse que vai tentar ter a mente mais aberta. Inclusive, parece que tem um cara que comentou no blog dele que fez a mesma interpretação que você. Sempre achei curioso isso: o que será que faz leitores assumirem significados tão extremos com tanta facilidade?[/quote]

Eu não disse que ele iria descartar o conhecimento científico que ele tem. Sim, concordo que ele está tentando ser mais cabeça aberta ao assunto, foi isso que entendi, não queria colocar acaso e exotéricos num sentido pejorativo.

Entretanto:

What do we, as game designers, know about videogames? Well, we know a few things, we know boss battles suck. We know jumping puzzles suck. We know you get great games by focusing on meaningful interaction and you don’t get great games from aping cinema and focusing on graphics.

Nesse momento eu fiquei fulo. De onde ele tirou essas idéias!? Do que eu entendi, ele chegou cientificamente pelo game design. (e é por isso que fiz comentei de visão sistemica e relativa)

Eu nunca afirmaria as coisas que ele comentou qualitativamente sobre os game elements e mais ainda sobre música, pinturas e poemas. Se o que ele falou representa a escola atual de game-design, ela está muito ruim, ou eu não entendo nada de design.

Essa relação era dupla, a primeira eu retomava de novo a parte sobre game elements, a segunda era a música etc. mas esses dois envolvem graus de análise diferentes, e eu deveria ter detalhado em parágrafos diferentes.

[quote]But songs are not designed, paintings are not designed, poems are not designed.[/quote]

Se sim, do que eu entendo de design, isso faz certo sentido. Se lembrarmos que “design” se traduz como “projeto”, e “projetar” envolve um “método”, então é razoável dizer isso se ele estiver se referindo à intenção artística dos autores. Isso é, o ato físico de pintar em si pode envolver um “método” (por exemplo), mas a escolha do que pintar e do porquê não parece envolver.

O que você falou coincide com o que vejo do design. A grande questão é que você parou no mesmo ponto em que acredito que ele errou: A escolha do que pintar e do porque não tem forte relação com projetar.

Te desafio: Pare de ler o post por um minuto e tente imaginar uma nova cor.

Provavelmente você começou a seguir alguns padrões lógicos, deve ter evitado pensar em objetos, pensou nas cores primárias e tentou mistura-las etc. Perceba que você seguiu algum tipo de lógica. Se há algum método lógico, então há algum nível de projeto para buscar idéias, e logo no sentido que você falou, design.

Certo, temos design para criar algo mentalmente. Agora se você conseguiu criar algo novo existe um problema, como eu coloco no papel ou equivalente?! Uma etapa é o que você comentou, os métodos físicos. Mas falta a outra… se você conseguiu pensar numa cor que está fora da tabela de cores do GIMP, você tem um baita abacaxi pra resolver, como você vai converter ela em pinceladas?!?

Você cria uma composição, a partir daí você cria um método para se manifestar. Eu sei que esse método é particular e nada científico, mas ainda assim é algum planejamento.

Ele não contradiz isso. Apenas observa que o "design acumulado" academicamente sistematizado é insuficiente. O que talvez seja um crítica melhor é ele aparentemente assumir que não seja possível sistematizar tudo.

Eu me pergunto se colocaremos tudo em termos da ciência um dia. Meu chute vago é sim, minha esperança é não.

Algo assim seria mais uma ciência. E a ciência é legal justamente porque ela nos dá esse tipo de garantia. Acho perfeitamente compreensível que ele goste desse tipo de conforto intelectual. E ele mesmo disse que tem medo da falta de sistematização. Se ele mesmo tem noção disso, não vejo porque cutucar ainda mais a ferida - eu me sentiria puramente sádico.

Na administração nós não temos essa visão absolutista da ciência. Apesar de fazermos pesquisas com o método, constantemente achamos contra exemplos das teorias. Talvez seja por isso que pareço que estou provocando ele.

Tá… relendo o texto eu pareço mesmo um sádico, vou consultar o que fiz com os últimos bot players que joguei para uma opinião democrática sobre meu nível de malignitude…

Depois do detalhamento semi-técnico que ele dá no início, é difícil de digerir os outros pedaços com sentido conotativo.

Eu não mal interpretei isso, ele comenta sobre trabalho duro, mas em nenhum momento ele comenta sobre como é esse trabalho, parece que isso é somente uma base para então uma idéia brilhante aparecer. A maneira como ele constrói o final não me parece que ele estava pensando em trabalhar duro, eu senti uma certa passividade nisso.

Pensando agora, acredito que estou atacando um ponto que não seja o foco do texto, mas que me pareceu subentendido pela forma como ele escreveu. Provavelmente o fato de já não ter uma visão de perfeição em relação ao conhecimento científico tenha me feito desviar do assunto.

P.S.: Sobre posições extremas, uma parte deve-se ao fato de não conseguirmos nos expressar corretamente, outra vem da pressa, mas a enorme maioria surge da ignorância (?) de ler além do que deve.